Focusing on behaviour management; a coaching perspective that delivers responsibility and reflection

A new and thought-provoking course with content that can transform classroom management and allow teachers, support staff and pastoral teams to reflect on their current behaviour management strategies and build new skills that will ensure low-level and more disruptive behaviour is minimised or eliminated.  Coaching is powerful when it is used to challenge and question behaviour that is unwelcome or not tolerated.  Coaching can be highly manipulative, for instance, learning how to use questioning skills effectively can have a devastating impact on the miscreant.  Their behaviour is challenged but in a way that deflects it back, where the trouble-maker is left owning the behaviour and having to take responsibility for the actions that have proved unacceptable.  Listening and learning from what is not said but seen can also be highly revealing in managing a pupil or an adult whose behaviour is disruptive. The reasons that lie behind the conduct displayed can be heard and explained through the development of deeper listening skills and provide the person who is managing the situation with the opportunity to disarm and un-nerve the perpetrator. Learning how to influence change can be highly useful for those with responsibility for dealing with the unacceptable. These might include voice control and management, using the power of silence, focusing on the positive and using interview techniques that ensure agreement or a contract for improving behaviour is accepted and implemented.

This course is part of our suite of coaching events. We have delivered it over the past term and have received high praise for its content and the quality of resources that those who attend can take back to use to share with colleagues.  Coaching is akin to excellent pedagogy and the outstanding lesson will rarely expose poor behaviour. Highlighting and practicing some of the powerful coaching skills that improve performance can have a significant impact on improving practice inside and outside the classroom especially for those teachers who sometimes find the behaviour of some of their pupils to be a challenge. Just send one person to this course, they will be able to share their learning with others back in school.

Character Education – Part of the tapestry of learning

Character Education is the subject of one of the reports to come out of the DfE this summer. It is a review of some research into Character Education in Schools. The research poses several questions linked to provision, the role of schools in teaching character, the approaches schools use and the challenges schools face.

Rising Stars provide a very good overview of the findings of the report in their document, DFE Publishes Character Education Report. 

Is it necessary to have a separate curriculum pathway called Character Education?

What is education if it is not a part of shaping the individual to be honest, have integrity and a respect for others?  All learning should stimulate curiosity and allow for problem solving that creates resilient and motivated learners. There are so many opportunities within the curriculum for learners to debate, focus on moral dilemma, learn self-respect and deepen their sense of fairness in order that they can contribute to society.

Subject specific learning is stuffed full of opportunities for pupils to develop their individual and unique characters.  English Literature or History allows us to analyse different characters and their influence on people, time and place. Maths and Science give us an awesome look at how the world is shaped and the part we can play in enjoying it, inventing it or using it.  Design, art music or drama provide us with a wealth of opportunities for creativity, expression and individuality. PE and sport develop the bodies and minds of learners and teach them how to win and lose, how to embrace competitiveness and how to be a team player.  Both the primary and secondary curriculum have the breadth and depth to encompass character education.

Most of the curriculum is currently taught in chunks, where the learning is not an interwoven tapestry that develops the whole person.  There are so many opportunities for pupils to develop a whole range of skills that will ensure they become independent and resilient, open to ideas and full of the possibilities that learning can bring.  School, especially upper primary and secondary stages often provides pupils with the facts and information they need to pass tests and examinations.  There is no other stage in their lives where they will learn in such small bite size segments that appear to be unconnected.

We don’t need an addition to the curriculum; we need to look at how we can shape the curriculum so that it builds character that will last a lifetime.