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Make sure lesson observation plays a key role in your CPD strategy.

Make sure lesson observation plays a key role in your CPD strategy.

Lesson observation is an important part of quality assurance in schools.  Observing lessons provides line managers with a good understanding of how their teams are performing and is a benchmark for assessing teaching and learning across the school.  The lesson is often observed by one person and the feedback is between the teacher and the observer.  There is little opportunity for the sharing and cascading of good or outstanding practice and limited scope for teachers who need support when their lesson is deemed unsatisfactory.

There is another way.  A school has a wealth of good and outstanding practice happening every day, very few lessons are observed and those that are seen are rarely shared.  Imagine a lesson observation process where the teacher chooses when to be observed and who they would like to observe; not to judge and grade but to share their practice, their approaches to pedagogy and generally to reflect together on their understanding of learning that leads to high levels of progression.

The opportunities to use lesson observation as an integral part of your CPD strategy involves everyone. It is cost effective because it is happening in school by practitioners for practitioners.  We have two highly influential and innovative training courses to help you ensure that outstanding teaching and learning is not your best kept secret.

The Art of Lesson Observation  – is for line managers and senior leaders who have a responsibility for observation of their teams. Read more about the content of the day by clicking here.

Lesson Study – Enhancing learning through professional collaboration and enquiry is for teachers to work together to observe their own teaching practice.  Read more about the content of the day by clicking here.

Coaching delivers cost effective and sustainable CPD

Coaching delivers cost effective and sustainable CPD

CPD is an essential ingredient in creating an outstanding school. The current budgetary constraints are putting a strain on school leaders. CPD in some schools can be something that suffers.  “Limiting the professional development of staff in a school could do “terrible damage”  in the long run” according to David Weston of the Teacher Development Trust in the TES for Friday 3rd March.

Developing a coaching culture is one of the most effective ways of making sure a small budget can have a significant impact on school improvement. CPD needs to be carefully structured. It must be linked to the school vision and improvement plan. Developing a coaching model will provide the impetus for high quality professional dialogue. Coaching allows for a shared understanding of what the school is trying to achieve and how each individual can play their part.

The Learning Cultures’ coaching offer focuses on building a coaching culture in school. Click here to view all our coaching training courses. It is proven to have a significant impact on learning and achievement. The training we deliver is built on well-respected research and is designed so that the learning can be taken back into school and cascaded to others. In this way it is uniquely cost effective and meets the Standard for teachers’ professional development announced by the Department of Education in the summer of 2016.

The coaching courses we offer encompass the needs of all staff from leaders and managers, to teachers and support staff.  Click here to have a look at what we offer.  Our fourth annual coaching conference is being held at Woburn Abbey on Thursday 29th June.  To book your place and find out more click here.  For those who want to build on their learning from the conference we are running our Leading a Coaching School training course the day after the conference on Friday 30th June so that senior leadership teams can begin to plan their strategy.

Go to the case studies page on our website where the Featherstone High School study has recently been updated.  Emma Harvey at Featherstone continues to steer the school’s coaching model. This is now an integral part of the CPD programme for the school. Consequently, coaching plays a significant part in the school’s continuing outstanding success.  We are gathering evidence from many of the schools we work with of the power of coaching to manage change, build highly effective teams and deliver outstanding teaching and learning

Telephone us on 01746 765076 Email us at info@learningcultures.org ask for Glynis or Alison.

 

Learning Cultures new website, new offices and an exciting cost effective and sustainable CPD offer for education

It is all change this term for Learning Cultures, we have a new website and new offices with a training suite so that we can offer training and development opportunities for small groups in the beautiful 15th century market town of Bridgnorth in the even more stunning county of Shropshire.

We are growing and our success is built on the quality of the training we offer and the expertise of our trainers, researchers and educational professionals. CPD is not an option for schools, it is an essential part of creating outstanding lessons, powerful leadership and innovative strategies for ensuring all learners are motivated to achieve their full potential.

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What does effective primary school teaching look like?

The Westminster Forum hosted an event last week to focus on Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountability.  One of the most interesting aspects of the morning was the opportunity to hear Dame Reena Keeble who was commissioned by the Teaching Schools Council to lead on an investigation into what constitutes effective primary teaching practice. Read more

Effective transition from Year 6 to Year 7

Effective transition from Year 6 to Year 7 – It’s all about continuity, sharing and challenging.

Creating a continuum of learning that builds on prior knowledge and skills, creates independent and enthusiastic learners and ensures every child can progress and achieve their full potential is what anyone who is in the education profession would agree with. So why is it that we still have a well-researched and continuing dip in performance of anything up to 39% for pupils at the end of year 7. Read more